Say AH!- By Medical Condition

AS A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER- THIS IS A SHORT LIST OF ORAL QUESTIONS AND MANIFESTATIONS THAT YOU SHOULD BE LOOKING FOR WITH SPECIFIC MEDICAL CONDITIONS:

Autoimmune
  • Arthritic effects on jaw joint- refer for TMJ screening
  • Dry mouth – increase caries risk
  • ALS/MS- muscle lock/chip teeth- make a mouth guard before muscle deteriorate to open wide enough
  •  Screen for oral candidiasis

Brain Health

  • Conflicting evidence: Data from another study of more than 50,000 people found that those with fewer teeth and more gum disease had a higher risk of stroke. However, other studies have uncovered no association between gum disease and stroke. (WebMD)

Cancer 

  • Dental screening for decay and periodontal disease prior to treatment
  • Xerostomia (dry mouth)- increased risk of caries: advise patient on what they can do to alleviate dry mouth
  • Oral Mucositis- inform patients to refrain from spicy or hot foods, alcohol

Diabetes

  • Increase risk of periodontal disease, which may affect control of diabetes
  • Increase risk of caries
  • Dry Mouth: increases risk for rapid decay
  • Oral Thrush, Salivary Changes
  • Ask if they have seen their dentist!

Gastrointestinal Conditions

  • Acid causes enamel on tooth to wear away- increase risk for cavities.
  • Ask about Fluoride treatment and dental screening
  •  Instruct patient to wait at least 20 minutes to brush their teeth after reflux or throwing up

Heart Health

  • Inflammation is a common denominator for both diseases. When people have moderate to severe gum disease, their levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a protein that rises during whole-body inflammation, increase. CRP levels are also used to assess a person’s risk of a heart attack. (Web MD)

HPV

  • White, non-smoking males age 35 to 55 are most at risk, 4 to 1 over females
  • Third leading cause of oral cancer with smoking and alcohol use
  • Instruct patients if they notice any lumps or sores in their mouth that do not go away within a week to visit their dentist.

HIV/AIDS

  • Increased risk of periodontal disease, oral candidiasis, xerostomia, oral warts, aphthous ulcers (canker sores) – refer to dentist for evaluation

Kidney Disease

  • Due to depletion in Ca+ at risk for bone loss in jaws, leading to tooth loss
  • Decrease salivary flow increases incidence of dry mouth: Advice to reduce the severity may include: avoiding mouth breathing; using a humidifier; avoiding tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, and mouthwashes containing alcohol; using sugar-free chewing gum to stimulate salivary flow; using saliva substitutes; and, if possible, modifying dosage of or changing xerostomic medications

Pregnancy 

  • Pregnancy Gingivitis
  • Screen for periodontal disease which may affect birth weight and premature births
  • Morning sickness increase acid in oral cavity- rinse with water and brush 20 minutes after
  • Caries are an infectious disease that can pass from caregiver to infant (no sharing spoons, testing bottle, cleaning pacifier, etc)

Respiratory Health

  • A new study suggests that periodontal disease may increase the risk for respiratory infections, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia.
  •  Good oral health recommended for prevention of respiratory disease, especially in geriatric patients
  • Strong correlation between bacteria pneumonia and periodontal disease- to prevent infection refer to dentist for screening

Sleep Apnea

  • Oral devices can shift and support the jaw to prevent the airway from collapsing.
  • Research shows that oral appliances can successfully prevent sleep apnea in some mild to moderate cases for patients non-compliant with C-PAP
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